What you could be doing:

Karma

Well-known member
Thank you all, Roker Park was magnificent. Well if you've just woken up excited for the game you'd almost believe anything but yes looking back how naive

Recently went to Halifax Towns stadium, walking right round from the large car park it's magnificent took ages to get to main entrance .Inside a nearly empty bit of a dump in need of bringing in to the 21st century. Dark, poor lighting uneven surfaces leaking roof cramped and broken seats. Some old grounds have character and a delight to visit . Sorry this was just depressing. Akin to my visit to Accrinton Stanley maybe 5 years ago, great team punching well above it's weight but no money spent on the ground sadly.
 

Karma

Well-known member
I was reminded of something we've enjoyed and could all be doing when I read the Yorkshire Post today. P2 there is a lovely photograph of rhubarb being grown in the Rhubarb Triangle betweem Wakefield, Morley and Rothwell. Ordinary rhubarb grown in the open is nice enough but forced rhubarb is essentially grown in the sheds in the dark , is much more delicate and interesting,.

We went along about 4 years ago to the farm mentioned ( E Oldroyd and Sons at Lofhouse) had a funny and interesting lecture first - did you know rhubarb originally hails from China as a medicine , not just something that makes a lovely crumble with custard. It has a protected status in that the description 'forced rhubarb' can only be used for that grown in this way and is consequently hard to find but worth searching out. The lady at Oldroyds who gives the talk is responsible for it getting its special status and has been honoured for doing so.F

Forced rhubarb is grown in the dark and when you subsequently are taken into the sheds , if you listen carefully , you can actually hear it growing. I know I'm prone to exaggeration but this is true. They use candles to provide limited light and so you can see. You can also buy some lovely forced rhubarb , products ( including alcoholic ones) you can take away or even as my wife did a fantastic woven re-usable shopping bag with W Oldroyd and Sons writ large on it. You'd have to Google for contact details but highly recommended if you can travel to this part of West Yorkshire
 
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Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
A lovely winter's day in York yesterday and, courtesy of an English Heritage pass, the York Cold War Bunker and Clifford's Tower were visited. I can recommend both. York Bunker is unique in the UK and Clifford's Tower has had much money spent making it a much more interesting visit. We walked in from the main road, Acomb Road, near the bunker area, about a mile, which allowed us free parking, and walked in through Micklegate Bar and down Micklegate where there were lots of interesting shops and cafes. We ate at Cafe 42, a small establishment, and enjoyed the food and drink. The Minster was of course an impressive sight. Fascinating that a famous Roman ruler, Constantine, became emperor here.

And spotted a sign on the wall of Betty's which said the Yorkshire Gentlemen CC was formed in that building in September 1863, so only a few months after YCCC was formed.
 

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
I was reminded of something we've enjoyed and could all be doing when I read the Yorkshire Post today. P2 there is a lovely photograph of rhubarb being grown in the Rhubarb Triangle betweem Wakefield, Morley and Rothwell. Ordinary rhubarb grown in the open is nice enough but forced rhubarb is essentially grown in the sheds in the dark , is much more delicate and interesting,.

We went along about 4 years ago to the farm mentioned ( E Oldroyd and Sons at Lofhouse) had a funny and interesting lecture first - did you know rhubarb originally hails from China as a medicine , not just something that makes a lovely crumble with custard. It has a protected status in that the description 'forced rhubarb' can only be used for that grown in this way and is consequently hard to find but worth searching out. The lady at Oldroyds who gives the talk is responsible for it getting its special status and has been honoured for doing so.F

Forced rhubarb is grown in the dark and when you subsequently are taken into the sheds , if you listen carefully , you can actually hear it growing. I know I'm prone to exaggeration but this is true. They use candles to provide limited light and so you can see. You can also buy some lovely forced rhubarb , products ( including alcoholic ones) you can take away or even as my wife did a fantastic woven re-usable shopping bag with W Oldroyd and Sons writ large on it. You'd have to Google for contact details but highly recommended if you can travel to this part of West Yorkshire
always fancied that visit
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
I'll make a beeline for York as soon as the daffodils come out, but it won't be Betty's or Cafe 42, it will be Drake's fish & chips on Petergate.01 Minster view.jpg
 
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DaveMorton

Well-known member
There was a folk song with the refrain: "Ee by gum, it were cold." That's all I can remember of it.

Too cold for me. Otherwise, that sounds great. A dusting of snow can add enchantment even to rubbish places...like Lancashire, for example.
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
A nice little aphorism on Countdown today. I may be the only person in the world who hadn't heard it before, but...

You don't stop playing when you grow old.
You grow old when you stop playing.
 

Karma

Well-known member
A lovely winter's day in York yesterday and, courtesy of an English Heritage pass, the York Cold War Bunker and Clifford's Tower were visited. I can recommend both. York Bunker is unique in the UK and Clifford's Tower has had much money spent making it a much more interesting visit. We walked in from the main road, Acomb Road, near the bunker area, about a mile, which allowed us free parking, and walked in through Micklegate Bar and down Micklegate where there were lots of interesting shops and cafes. We ate at Cafe 42, a small establishment, and enjoyed the food and drink. The Minster was of course an impressive sight. Fascinating that a famous Roman ruler, Constantine, became emperor here.

And spotted a sign on the wall of Betty's which said the Yorkshire Gentlemen CC was formed in that building in September 1863, so only a few months after YCCC was formed.
Being born and spending my formative years on Eboracum I appreciate all you say Hawke. The bunker (and the windmill at Holgate a little further that way) absolutely great and lots of York residents don't know what is there. Clifford's Tower - I haven't been in it since the recent work was completed but you've enthused me to put it now on my must do list. The Minster magnificent even before going inside to catch the best view of the Rose window and maybe, just maybe, if it's a dry day and you are feeling energetic, to climb to the top for the best view of York .

And Betty's. What a history, pricy but excellent food served with style. I wonder do they still have the bar where the WWll aircrew added their signatures? There used to be a Terry's Restaurant directly opposite Betty's but with the demise of 'Terry's of York' chocolatiers that closed and became a Carlucciou's . It's changed again with the demise of the latter but if you get chance , regardless of who now owns the building, go in and make your way downdstairs to see the magnificent toilets! I think they imported several marble quarriesworth of the best stone.

Micklegate bar - used to catch my bus near there after school if I hadn' t spent it. The man who painted the coats of arms and did a lot of the gilding on all the bars (gateways) was a near neighbour as was a gentleman who used to drive the engine on Rowntree's sweet factory private railway line - often he'd let us ride on the footplate) , you'd get the sack for doing that now but sadly all gone now but engendered my love of railways (and the railway museum) and Rowntrees Fruit Pastiles, Smarties and all.
 
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DaveMorton

Well-known member
I was disappointed with the view, when I climbed the Minster. I was so surprised that, from there, you can't even see the Ouse. We went up in little pods of 6 or 10, then we had to leave to make way for the next group. Bloody hard climb for little reward.

From street level, York is superb. I have a particular fondness for the Merchant Adventurers Hall.
 

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
I was disappointed with the view, when I climbed the Minster. I was so surprised that, from there, you can't even see the Ouse. We went up in little pods of 6 or 10, then we had to leave to make way for the next group. Bloody hard climb for little reward.

From street level, York is superb. I have a particular fondness for the Merchant Adventurers Hall.
Being born and spending my formative years on Eboracum I appreciate all you say Hawke. The bunker (and the windmill at Holgate a little further that way) absolutely great and lots of York residents don't know what is there. Clifford's Tower - I haven't been in it since the recent work was completed but you've enthused me to put it now on my must do list. The Minster magnificent even before going inside to catch the best view of the Rose window and maybe, just maybe, if it's a dry day and you are feeling energetic, to climb to the top for the best view of York .

And Betty's. What a history, pricy but excellent food served with style. I wonder do they still have the bar where the WWll aircrew added their signatures? There used to be a Terry's Restaurant directly opposite Betty's but with the demise of 'Terry's of York' chocolatiers that closed and became a Carlucciou's . It's changed again with the demise of the latter but if you get chance , regardless of who now owns the building, go in and make your way downdstairs to see the magnificent toilets! I think they imported several marble quarriesworth of the best stone.

Micklegate bar - used to catch my bus near there after school if I hadn' t spent it. The man who painted the coats of arms and did a lot of the gilding on all the bars (gateways) was a near neighbour as was a gentleman who used to drive the engine on Rowntree's sweet factory private railway line - often he'd let us ride on the footplate) , you'd get the sack for doing that now but sadly all gone now but engendered my love of railways (and the railway museum) and Rowntrees Fruit Pastiles, Smarties and all.
Great descriptions. Yes we made a small detour en route back to the car to see the Holgate windmill. I was amazed to see it on a grassy roundabout in a suburban street. That and the one at Skidby in East Yorks are apparently the only working windmills left in Yorkshire. The board said they are in fact Lincolnshire style windmills. Actually our secondary school bus used to take us past Skidby Windmill every day, there and back, travelling between Cottingham and Beverley. Two brothers got on and off the bus every day at the stop by the mill.
 

Karma

Well-known member
I was disappointed with the view, when I climbed the Minster. I was so surprised that, from there, you can't even see the Ouse. We went up in little pods of 6 or 10, then we had to leave to make way for the next group. Bloody hard climb for little reward.

From street level, York is superb. I have a particular fondness for the Merchant Adventurers Hall.

As always , fabulous photographs, DaveMorton. I particularly like those in St Sampsons Square with 'the jugglers and clowns when they did tricks for you' - but not the pickpockets who are also attracted by the large crowds.

I suppose if the best fish and chip shop can often be the one in which you are eating at the time the same can be said of views. Sometimes when we go to York we stop off at the Park and Ride just off the A64 (sometimes visiting the Bishopthorpe Crematorium to leave flowers) We'd take the Park and Ride bus getting off in Blossom Street at The Odeon Cinema ( where as a child I'd go to the Odeon Club and sing " Oh we come along on Saturday morning, greeting everybody with a smile etc" before 2 films and a cartoon. Sometimes even going into the loo to open the emergency exit to let in others kids)

Anyway it's a hundred yard walk to Micklegate bar but instead going through the bar we'd climb up onto the walls, well the walkway on the inside of the walls.
Usually we'd take the anticlockwise route and work our way round to Skedergate bridge , over the river , where that section of the walls finished. As you go over the bridge you can see Clifford's Tower in front of you. There are a few missing section of the walls, the next section runs past where long gone open-air cattle market used to be held a delight as a child to watch from your lofty perch. Other sections take you looking down on Lord Mayor's Walk then turning along and above Gillygate where there are great views into the back of the Minster and private gardens eventually breaking in Exhibition Square and another Bar Short walk right turn over another river bridge and back onto the walls passing the railway station and eventually back to Micklegste bar. Great and different views all round the walls of the city, a good way to see the sights.

As a schoolboy it was a 'game' to push other boys off the walls onto the grassy bank. With hindsight pretty dangerous and there is now more fencing to prevent this. Happy days
 

Capybara

Member
Drakes (no apostrophe on the sign) is a chain, isn't it? I know of one in Harrogate, one in Knaresborough and one in Leeds. The best chips I've had recently were in a place near to Farsley Celtic that I went to just before Christmas. They had scallops, too, which you don't see quite so often these days.
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
I didn't know Drakes was a chain. The Fisherman's Wife is also - or was - including one up the Otley Road at Headingley (used to be Bryans, with or without an apostrophe), and another next to the pier at Whitby.

Then there's the Wetherby Whaler, one of which is on the ring-road not too far from Clifton Park. [Many's the time I have stood on the dockside at Wetherby, watching the great trawlers unload their catch, beneath the circling seagulls, wondering how on earth they had managed to get there.]

I suffered from an exploding ketchup bottle at the York WW. I gave it the smallest shake - as one does - and it went off like a roman candle! Very embarrassed management offered to pay for my shirt laundering, totally unnecessary nice gesture. Good food. Prefer it to the Dormouse, next door to the cricket club, which is a bit pricey and pretentious, though excellent for eating outside. I also go to Bella's Kitchen, walking distance along the main road, at Clifton Green.

Any other suggestions for eating actually in York? Decent sensibly priced steak anywhere? Curry?
 

Karma

Well-known member
I know we've touched upon chip shops and scallops before . I remember these more from my childhood as slices of potato, battered and deep fried. However although I've never eaten one, modern fine dining scallops come out of a shell and are therefore shellfish. Anyway If you can remember the name of the chip shop near Farsley Celtic or approximate location, Capybara, I'll look it out on Saturday when I'm back in leeds and will be attending the Farsley v Brackley game. I normally get my chips in the ground but always happy to try a recommendation

Incidentally my favourite fish and chip shop in York is in Gilllygate. There used to be two but 'Wackers' (near to the BBC York building) closed last year I think . The one I've consistently used is immediately adjacent to the Gillygate carpark, particularly when going to York City's old 'Bootham Crescent' ground. It's a little rustic.The owner is a football supporter too (Sheffield United) , good value and they do 'scraps' or' bits' whereas most fisheries don't bother.

I'd recommend a couple of vegetarian restaurants in York (fantastic one in Goodramgate) but not everyone wants meat free
 

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
Drakes (no apostrophe on the sign) is a chain, isn't it? I know of one in Harrogate, one in Knaresborough and one in Leeds. The best chips I've had recently were in a place near to Farsley Celtic that I went to just before Christmas. They had scallops, too, which you don't see quite so often these days.
Croft Street Fisheries in Farsley is very good. A few years ago I spotted Raymond Illingworth's car parked outside it.
 
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