Strauss Report

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
Thought I would start a new thread for this one and start with an interesting piece from Peakfan's Blog.

 

Karma

Well-known member
"There is no need to re-invent cricket just have a better schedule and marketing" ...

I think that's the final quote and I wholheartedy agree. That and having County Cricket including weekends,
2 x9 (or 10)Championship divisions, basically abandoning the 100. Call me old fashioned but I know what I like.

Good article
 

Newby

Well-known member
For all the hype about families, young children, and those who have never watched cricket before going to watch a live game, the hundred is primarily aimed at a television audience. The reported drop in viewer numbers is therefore to be welcomed in hopefully ensuring it doesn't remain beyond the current Broadcast deal.

I believe those are figures for the games shown on the BBC only, and across the UK total numbers are down from 16.1 million in 2021 to 14.1 million in 2022. Again, good news for those of us who would like to see it gone.

I'm pretty sure, having paid so much for it, Sky will be receiving some coin for overseas rights that may make it worth their while seeking to keep it going.

I hope the new ECB hierarchy can look beyond the balance sheet and see this monster they have created for what it really is, a game aimed at people to watch in their own homes, possibly on their own devices, a kind of video game which they are going to have to constantly tweak to keep their audience interested and, perhaps who knows, choreograph and edit to add to the excitement and ensure there are no boring bits.

If they want young people to learn to play and enjoy cricket and engender a lifetimes interest in the game they need to a get a bat or ball into their hands through schools and an enhanced Kwik cricket programme and just let nature take its course.
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
Kwik cricket is okay for a PE lesson, though a game of rounders is probably more fun, and just as relevant to real cricket.

Remember Lord McLaurin (? the Tesco man) stating on the basis of Kwik Cricket that more schools were playing the game than ever before in our history? Now he really was a dangerous lunatic.

Back in the late 60s, the two primary schools who 'fed' North Manchester HS both really played cricket. They played against one another, regularly, timeless matches of a couple of hours every night after school, for as many night as it took to complete the game. Then they'd start another one.

They turned up at high school knowing how to field and how to run between wickets. They knew the names of the fielding positions, and at least had a clue about the no ball and lbw laws. They were already cricketers, at eleven. Great material to work with!

On rounders. or soft ball, as they liked to call it, I used to glance at PE lessons when I had a chance. You could pick a potential cricketer out a mile away, and you could certainly eliminate the non-cricketers.
 

Newby

Well-known member
Good points DM but isn't that attitude perhaps guilty of trying to source the next level of professional cricketers by the time they are about 8, whilst pushing those who haven't got that much talent out of the game.

I never played cricket very well, perhaps having come to it too late. But I enjoyed playing or attempting to play in the street, in the park or on the beach in the summer months, just as much as I enjoyed playing other ball games at other times of the year. I don't think that comes naturally to kids these days who now seem happy to either kick a football around all year round, or worse still stay indoors.
 

Karma

Well-known member
For all the hype about families, young children, and those who have never watched cricket before going to watch a live game, the hundred is primarily aimed at a television audience. The reported drop in viewer numbers is therefore to be welcomed in hopefully ensuring it doesn't remain beyond the current Broadcast deal.

I believe those are figures for the games shown on the BBC only, and across the UK total numbers are down from 16.1 million in 2021 to 14.1 million in 2022. Again, good news for those of us who would like to see it gone.

I'm pretty sure, having paid so much for it, Sky will be receiving some coin for overseas rights that may make it worth their while seeking to keep it going.

I hope the new ECB hierarchy can look beyond the balance sheet and see this monster they have created for what it really is, a game aimed at people to watch in their own homes, possibly on their own devices, a kind of video game which they are going to have to constantly tweak to keep their audience interested and, perhaps who knows, choreograph and edit to add to the excitement and ensure there are no boring bits.

If they want young people to learn to play and enjoy cricket and engender a lifetimes interest in the game they need to a get a bat or ball into their hands through schools and an enhanced Kwik cricket programme and just let nature take its
Yes i agree 100%, put a bat and ball in the kids' hands and at an early age.

I had the 'luxury' of playing 'cricket' from about age 5 or 6 with an orange box for the stumps and a solid rubber ball which you felt if it hit you anywhere. We played in the street as there was no traffic and it could be 3 a side or 13 a side only one bat of course and although it had its own rules (eg you couldn't be out first ball or you could be caught 'out' one-handed on second bounce) it still engendered a love of cricket which evolved over the years.

Yes, we played at junior school and subsequently Grammar school though in the latter I'm afraid I sold out in favour of RL (My peripheral vision is poor so I couldn't bat or catch too well which are prerequisites for playing) However there are other forms of 'social' cricket. I enjoyed' Cricket Wicket' after work, indoors (at Sweet St in Leeds), particularly in the winter months where you could be out loads of times but kept on batting. Your' times out' would be deducted from total 'runs'. A fast, frantic, and humorous game where everyone was playing against everyone else. Only drawback was artificial turf, carpet burns were a reminder to stay on your feet.

However, I rarely see kids playing in the street now and rarely in the local parks in a game they've organised themselves. Yes, the local cricket clubs have junior teams, but a lot of youngsters are slipping through the net. I sometimes see in Rounhay Park on the general grassy areas games between Asian kids on a Saturday but not non-Asian kids. Maybe this is a cultural thing too There are so many other things to which kids have access. So, a major investment in schools' cricket is needed, Kwik cricket or variants

I'm afraid though that Sky and the Hundred are here to stay Both are really not about cricket as a passion but making money. The monster that's eating all cricket. It has surprised me that they haven't got together with Sky betting (or whatever it's called) and. introduced Blundered Bingo to run alongside the game and coincidentally make more money. and satisfying the armchair 'supporter'
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
We played in the street and in the school playground, with a tennis ball or, better, a hard rubber ball which bounced fiercely. We played endlessly in Wibsey Park with a 'corky', which was ferociously hard, but cheap and everlasting. No gloves or pads, let alone helmets. We were little kids, no one ever got hurt, much.

I remember one day some big kids turned up (perhaps all of 11 or 12) and tried to take over. I was batting and they tried to pull the bat out of my hands. I told them they had to get me out, if they wanted a bat, shamed them into playing the game by our rules. It was the first real innings of my life, I was scared to death, but they couldn't get me out and, eventually, lost interest and left.

A seed was sown, for an opening batsman of the future. I had never felt so alive, doing anything, and that feeling remained all my playing days. It's the little death of 'being out' which makes cricket special. Games at which you're not out, are not cricket.
 
Last edited:

Donnylad

Well-known member
'and a solid rubber ball which you felt if it hit you anywhere.'

Ah! The 'Sorbo' ball! They still make them. We played in the passage way down the side of our house.
My Mum could bowl a devastating underarm leg break with one of those ... and our dustbin was the wicket. My Dad mad my first bat from a leaf of an old dining table .. talk about heavy ... I always said that was why I had no backlift later!

At junior school it was playground cricket with stumps in a wooden block (Dad made a set for the passage way later on) and a composition 'corky' ball - now that did hurt and it didn't bounce either!
 

Karma

Well-known member
We played in the street and in the school playground, with a tennis ball or, better, a hard rubber ball which bounced fiercely. We played endlessly in Wibsey Park with a 'corky', which was ferociously hard, but cheap and everlasting. No gloves or pads, let alone helmets. We were little kids, no one ever got hurt, much.

I remember one day some big kids turned up (perhaps all of 11 or 12) and tried to take over. I was batting and they tried to pull the bat out of my hands. I told them they had to get me out, if they wanted a bat, shamed them into playing the game by our rules. It was the first real innings of my life, I was scared to death, but they couldn't get me out and, eventually, lost interest and left.

A seed was sown, for an opening batsman of the future.
Even at your tender young age you taught your elders (but not your betters) that cricket and life have rules and for a good reason. Also to stand up to bullies.

Oh, and you also taught them not to mess with you. Besides I bet it was your bat and as you say a seed was sown...........
 

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
We played in the street and in the school playground, with a tennis ball or, better, a hard rubber ball which bounced fiercely. We played endlessly in Wibsey Park with a 'corky', which was ferociously hard, but cheap and everlasting. No gloves or pads, let alone helmets. We were little kids, no one ever got hurt, much.

I remember one day some big kids turned up (perhaps all of 11 or 12) and tried to take over. I was batting and they tried to pull the bat out of my hands. I told them they had to get me out, if they wanted a bat, shamed them into playing the game by our rules. It was the first real innings of my life, I was scared to death, but they couldn't get me out and, eventually, lost interest and left.

A seed was sown, for an opening batsman of the future. I had never felt so alive, doing anything, and that feeling remained all my playing days. It's the little death of 'being out' which makes cricket special. Games at which you're not out, are not cricket.
Ha! Wibsey Park. I played for Eastbrook CC in the Bradford Mutual Sunday School League in 1975 and we practiced on a midweek evening there.
 

Karma

Well-known member
Ha! Wibsey Park. I played for Eastbrook CC in the Bradford Mutual Sunday School League in 1975 and we practiced on a midweek evening there.
Just as well, Hawke, you didn't try to gate-crash one of Dave Morton's games
 

tbsteve

Active member
Lancs have been deducted 6 pts in the CC for an accumulation of fixed penalties. This from Wells on two of them:

"Lancashire opener Wells, 31, said it was "very frustrating" to have suffered the deduction, adding: "I'm gutted that I was implicated in this after hitting my bat on the ground after being bowled last year v Glamorgan at Cardiff and shouting in frustration whilst inside the changing room at Northants."

I can't think of any other TEAM sport where TEAMS are deducted points so often. It's wrong for a governing body to have so much power over league positions and tournament progression. We benefited from this in the T20, but as I said at the time, I'd have preferred us to go through on merit or not at all. Surely it's time that the counties revolt and tell the ECB what to do with their points deductions.

Rather than debate the Strauss review, let's just scrap it and set up independent leagues run by the counties, and allow the players to play for England if counties are remunerated adequately (and if pooled, that can replace ECB handouts).
 

Donnylad

Well-known member
Soccer clubs can be fined for 'failing to control their players' and that is a whole lot more difficult I suspect!

I have said before that these points should be accrued as 'bad behaviour points' by the individual player and then used to issue bans.
 

tbsteve

Active member
True that fans would be harder to control, but a fine wouldn't alter league position. The disciplinary committee seem to be docking more and more points. It makes a mockery of the league
 

Karma

Well-known member
Could't agree more , bad behaviour should count against the perpetrator. As far as oversized bats however I think penalties should count against the player ( not team) but also against the team coach who should carry out inspections
 

Newby

Well-known member
Could't agree more , bad behaviour should count against the perpetrator. As far as oversized bats however I think penalties should count against the player ( not team) but also against the team coach who should carry out inspections
I have to agree, with knobs on. Ban the player concerned, or it it's considered to be a team issue, then impose a fine on the clubs if you have to, but gerrymandering the points table is totally ridiculous.
 

Newby

Well-known member
The more I read about the rules surrounding points deductions the less I like them.

All three clubs, Leicestershire, Durham and Lancashire, had been warned and had the suspended sentence of x number of points hanging over their heads.

For Durham it was either 16 Championship points, or 2 points in one of the other competitions.
For Leicestershire it was 12 Championship points or 2 points in one of the other competitions.
For Lancashire it was the same 12 Championship points or 2 points in one of the other competitions.

Durham lost 2 pretty worthless RLODC points
Leicestershire lost 2 vital T20 Blast points which put them out of the competition.
Lancashire have lost 6 Championship points, only half the number that were being held against them, because of mitigating circumstances.

Not only is the system rotten, but it's also not consistent.
 
Last edited:

DaveMorton

Well-known member
What's the point of being in power, if you can't abuse that power and hurt people?

Note: these punishments are always handed out by the ECB (Enemy of Cricket Board), but the decisions are actually made by people, who have names, which are never disclosed. Rotten to the core.

And a team can behave, on the field, like Surrey did at Scarborough, and not be penalised!
 

tbsteve

Active member
And that highlights that it's all subjective. I watched pretty much the whole Surrey game on live stream and thought it was played in good spirits - both teams playing hard but also enjoying each others company. Concern from the Surrey batsman after the ball hit our fielder, laughing and smiles between Lyth and Overton as they walked off. Overton was discussed on comms, as being a guy that opposition fans disliked, but JD and the Surrey guy seemed to agree that he was just big hearted and wasn't afraid to show his emotions.

Given Wells' comments on what one of his punishments was for, Hill must have been close to getting a warning last night. Would I? No - I have no issue with players showing their emotions. But I can easily imagine some more officious umpires taking a dislike to Hill first pausing and then swishing his bat around.

All of which just highlights how ridiculous points deductions are for issues that can't be calculated quantitatively. We don't give points for style, or effort, because these are qualitative judgements. Things like bat size can be measured for sure - but surely you can do that before actually batting and then just tell the guys to use a different bat rather than penalise them after the event, and worse, penalise the whole team.
 

Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
yes individuals not teams....note YCCC are not on the list...and to my knowledge are not on a warning....
 
Top