Season's Greetings

Newby

Well-known member
Here's wishing a Merry and Peaceful Christmas to all, with an extra little bit of holly on top, just for cricket lovers.
 

Donnylad

Well-known member
Here's a Merry Christmas to the Gentlemen of the Corridor and a Happy and Peaceful New Year to follow.
 

Karma

Well-known member
Yes, a very Merry Christmas to all and a prosperous New Year (hopefully a New Season ending top of the division and harmony at the club)

And it's also Alastair Cook's 38th birthday today, so a double cellabration for him after the cows are milked. Imagine his face if he has only two parcels to open and the first one is a single bookend.

Winter well to all 'ti's the season to be jolly...
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
2025 = 45 squared, as any half-mathematician would know, therefore 2021 = 43 x 47, difference of two squares.
Next year is a multiple of 11, which tends to happen every 11 years. Exciting times!

Now, where's that Vogon spaceship when you need one?
 

Donnylad

Well-known member
I've got this terrible pain in the diodes down my left hand side .... or did I have too much Christmas dinner at out daughter's yesterday?
 

Donnylad

Well-known member
Indeed .... 'so long and thanks for all the fish' ... the dolphins at the RU really know where their towels are.
 

Newby

Well-known member
As an atheist, can I wish everyone a Happy Saturnalia?
It's got a 'happy' before it so I will take it and return it.

Enjoyed Christmas but it's good to be back home to boring normality once again if only to be able to browse, watch, walk or read as the mood takes me, slightly modified of course by someone else's mood.

The weather of course may still be bad for a few months yet, but I find it more bearable once we are past Christmas, and I know the daylight will last just that tiny bit longer every day.
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
It's a nice sine curve, the daylight hours. About 7.5 hours of light at t = zero on Dec 21st, at our latitude, up to 12 hours on March 21st, and around 16.5 hours at max on June 21st, but the increments are small at this time of year, the odd minute per day only, gradually increasing in rate until the daylight hours increase with a rush from around Feb 19th to April 21st.

I remember plotting the graph from the data in my Letts Schoolboy Diary about 65 years ago.
 

Newby

Well-known member
In this part of the world at least the Sunrise time barely moves, in fact it gets marginally darker in the mornings after the 21st of December until a full week into January. All the extra minutes of light come in the afternoon.

It's not really that important to me now though it does cheer me up a bit, but back in the day, when I set myself the task of walking to and from work it made a big difference to my mood.

The Wireless station where I worked covered 24/7 365 days a year with a shift system starting times of 0700, 1300 and 2200. At this time of year I had to trudge up by the road for the early and late shifts until that great day, just into February, when it was light enough to take a slightly shorter but infinitely nicer route through some woodland, firstly after the night shift and then a few weeks later to get in for the early shift. For a glorious few months in summer I could even use it after the afternoon shift.
 

Karma

Well-known member
In this part of the world at least the Sunrise time barely moves, in fact it gets marginally darker in the mornings after the 21st of December until a full week into January. All the extra minutes of light come in the afternoon.

It's not really that important to me now though it does cheer me up a bit, but back in the day, when I set myself the task of walking to and from work it made a big difference to my mood.

The Wireless station where I worked covered 24/7 365 days a year with a shift system starting times of 0700, 1300 and 2200. At this time of year I had to trudge up by the road for the early and late shifts until that great day, just into February, when it was light enough to take a slightly shorter but infinitely nicer route through some woodland, firstly after the night shift and then a few weeks later to get in for the early shift. For a glorious few months in summer I could even use it after the afternoon shift.


I think I can picture that, maybe, travelled a similar route (but in the car) after cricket to stay at Wykeham. I could be wrong , often am , but G**Q is my best guess, beautiful view on a sunny evening, heading West.

I said to my wife yesterday, trying to sound optomistic, 'we've now passed the day, this year, this winter, with the shortest daylight hours', She replied that it's, '10 minutes more daylight, about 2 minutes a day'. I don't think she had a schoolboy diary but she's never wrong about anything (she tells me). Still look forward to those long light evenings when the swallows swoop low over the fields feeding on the wing. Or watching the sun setting late almost into the next day on the Western coasts of Scotlands Western Isles.
 
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DaveMorton

Well-known member
The Met office figures for Manchester are:
Today: sunrise 8.26, set 15.56 Next Tuesday: 8.25 and 16.02
So that's a gain of 7 minutes light in six days.
 

Karma

Well-known member
At this rate by the start of the cricket season we'll be blinded by the light . Any idea why that might also have a link to a man in the Christmas quiz?
 

Newby

Well-known member
That's the one Karma, I started walking when my car was in for an engine rebuild and continued for the remaining 5 years or so I worked there, one of my better decisions. Some marvellous sunrise/sunsets in that time not to mention some epic dark starry skies. The light pollution in that area is much worse now than it used to be.

It soon speeds up DM, 3.5 minutes a day by the end of January when the mornings gets it's act together.
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
And the steepest part of the sine wave is at 45 degrees, i.e. around the spring equinox. Just have to be patient! April, come she will.
 
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