cricket/music quiz

Donnylad

Well-known member
Some sneaky ones to end with???

Aussie No 4
Michael/Michael Clarke OR Gene/Stuart Clark (I think it is Michael because Stuart Clark never seems to have been captain.)


Aussie No 7
John/Wayne Phillips OR perhaps Michelle/Wayne Phillips (I think this could either way!!)


The Boolean Machine is having a quick rub down before starting on the King Bill College Quiz!
 

byased

Active member
Some sneaky ones to end with???

Aussie No 4
Michael/Michael Clarke OR Gene/Stuart Clark (I think it is Michael because Stuart Clark never seems to have been captain.)


Aussie No 7
John/Wayne Phillips OR perhaps Michelle/Wayne Phillips (I think this could either way!!)


The Boolean Machine is having a quick rub down before starting on the King Bill College Quiz!
Well done DL, and the machine.
The two Michael Clarkes are correct. Gene Clark was the more famous Byrd, but spelling different, Michael was a founder member, but another who died young.
John Phillips was the one, no women I am afraid, must still be in a time warp!

Well done all.
Would be a good match if actually played, although I think the Aussie team looks a little stronger.
Look forward to Dave Morton's poetry quiz. I have to disagree with his description of Fairport Convention though. They were a long way removed from finger in the ear folk, although they did some versions of traditional songs. Babbacombe Lee was a very good album, all about John Lee, the man they couldn't hang. Three times he was put on the gallows, and each time they would not work, a mystery never solved. After three times, the law was he had suffered enough.
 
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DaveMorton

Well-known member
I'll have to think about the poetry quiz. One way would be to copy the idea of this thread, with a line or two from a poem and the matching name of a cricketer.

Example: Surrey left hander and....
"Fond lovers' parting is sweet, painful pleasure,
Hope beaming mild on the soft parting hour..."


But I'm not sure there are all that many poets/cricketers names that match.

How about a Yorkshire overseas player and "I should be glad of another death."?

They're both too easy, using Google on the quotation, but if you don't know the answer, it's not possible to deduce it any other way. By the way, it was book, film and short story titles such as "Paths of Glory" and "What rough beast?" that brought me into poetry in the first place. Curiosity + google opened a new world to me. [No cricket connection with those two.]
 
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DaveMorton

Well-known member
Let us not stray into the realms of fantasy, Corporal Byased.

I think these shows: Dad's Army, the Pythons & Fawlty Towers, Reginald Perrin, Hitch Hiker's Guide, etc, actually define what it is to be English (not British!) more than anything else. Smashing! Super!

Quiz question: Who was the English author whose character invented 'nause ratings'? "The Nause Norm is 100," so you can assign a nause rating to anyone. Boris Johnson, about 150, for example; Kevin Pietersen perhaps a bit more than that? Jonathan Ross, Piers Morgan, Giles Clarke, off the scale.
 
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Hawke

Administrator
Staff member
Well done DL, and the machine.
The two Michael Clarkes are correct. Gene Clark was the more famous Byrd, but spelling different, Michael was a founder member, but another who died young.
John Phillips was the one, no women I am afraid, must still be in a time warp!

Well done all.
Would be a good match if actually played, although I think the Aussie team looks a little stronger.
Look forward to Dave Morton's poetry quiz. I have to disagree with his description of Fairport Convention though. They were a long way removed from finger in the ear folk, although they did some versions of traditional songs. Babbacombe Lee was a very good album, all about John Lee, the man they couldn't hang. Three times he was put on the gallows, and each time they would not work, a mystery never solved. After three times, the law was he had suffered enough.
Yes I must also stand up for Fairport Convention. I think Dave is confusing them with somebody else. Their electric folk albums Liege and Lief and Full House are terrific. I've seen them a couple of times. Well done byased with the quiz.
 

Donnylad

Well-known member
Yes I must also stand up for Fairport Convention. I think Dave is confusing them with somebody else. Their electric folk albums Liege and Lief and Full House are terrific. I've seen them a couple of times. Well done byased with the quiz.
Excellent quiz!
 

DaveMorton

Well-known member
Yes I must also stand up for Fairport Convention. I think Dave is confusing them with somebody else. Their electric folk albums Liege and Lief and Full House are terrific. I've seen them a couple of times. Well done byased with the quiz.
I've just been wandering down Memory Lane and listening to some of this old stuff on YouTube. I had mates who had albums by Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span, which I liked parts of, but also got bored with their self-conscious "Aren't we clever?" music. To me it was the sort of stuff you were told you ought to like; I felt the same about modern jazz, which actually was the stuff Mike d'Abo used to play on the piano for us. Yes, very skilful, but no, not my thing. Okay in small quantities, when it was a mate playing it. Dave Brubeck? Was that the guy who was famous? Hated him. Someone had an LP. Time for a quick exit.

Steeleye Span were definitely more finger-in-the-ear than Fairport, but also a bit livelier. The Folk scene in Manchester was much more singalong, with a mix of drinking songs, sea shanties and protest stuff from Lancashire and Ireland. Occasionally, someone would come along playing American blues, or Irish tiddly-tiddly and we would walk out and go to the pub - if we weren't already in one! - until they'd finished. A constant favourite was 'She moves through the fair', which I see Fairport did; I look forward to their version later. I've just saved a whole album - 'What we did on our holidays' - and I see it's on that. Enjoying it, so far.

Back at the MSG Folk Club, there was a big, fat whisky-drinking Scot (Alex Campbell?) who used to perform to a hushed and reverential audience. Best of the best. Packed house when he was playing, his contempt for politicians, "those cheats who would take us to war again," nudged me toward the Left.

I had a mate in Manchester who had a Vietnam protest record entitled "Kill a Commie for Christ" which we must have worn out, a roomful of Bolshie potholers!
 

byased

Active member
I think you should try a bit of Napalm Death or Slipknot. You would need fingers in both ears, and would still end up deaf.
Saw Steeleye Span twice, once in 1973, and once in 2019! Not my favourites, they ended up trying to be a bit too commercial for my liking.
 

byased

Active member
friend of mine drops a copy of the Wisden magazine in to me quite often. In it this time is a quiz, where all the players share the surname with a musician or band member. Do you think Wisden look on t'corridor?
 

Karma

Well-known member
Absolutely .

" Open your eyes and your ears and you're influenced", said a writer of music defending being accused of plagiarism.
 
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